TABLE 1.

Family-Friendly Policies and their Current Status in North Carolina

Family-Friendly PolicyDefinitionStatus in North Carolina
Breastfeeding ProtectionProvides nondiscrimination protection and reasonable, paid break time to pump milk in a clean, private space (not a bathroom), temporary transfer to less strenuous positions, and breaks for increased food or beverage intakeLactating individuals have the right to breastfeed in any public or private location. Although the federal Fair Labor Standards Act provides workplace protection for lactating employees, no state law exists supporting lactating individuals
Kin Care LeavePaid short-term time off (hours or days) to care for a family member’s illness or injury, or to attend health-related appointmentsKin Care Leave is endorsed by the Child Fatality Task Force, a legislative study commission formed in 1993, and a bill was introduced in the 2019 and 2021 sessions, but no current state law exists
Paid Family and Medical LeaveIncome replacement and extended time off to bond with a new child, either biological, adopted, or foster; address a serious health condition (including pregnancy); care for a family member with a serious health condition; or address family circumstances arising from a military service member’s deploymentExecutive Order No. 95, signed by Governor Roy Cooper in 2019, provides 8 weeks of fully paid parental leave to an eligible state employee who has given birth to a child, and 4 weeks of fully paid parental leave in other circumstances involving the birth of a child, or the adoption, foster placement, or other legal placement of a child. This policy was also adopted by the University of North Carolina Board of Governors
22 local governments (counties and cities) have adopted some form of paid leave, whether parental or family leave
No statewide law exists for private sector employees
Pregnancy AccommodationsProvides nondiscrimination protection and workplace adjustments to ensure pregnant individuals can perform essential job functions with equal benefit and privilege of employment, such as changes in workstations or seating, more frequent or longer breaks, periodic rest, assistance with manual labor, modified work schedules including working from home, modified work assignments, adjustment to dress codes, provision of safety gear, temporary transfer, access to food or beverages at workstations, closer parking, etc.Executive Order No. 82, signed by Governor Roy Cooper in 2018, provides nondiscrimination protection and workplace accommodations to State Agency employees
No statewide law exists for private sector employees, though bills that would have provided this were introduced in 2019 and 2021
Safe LeavePaid short-term time off to address individual or a family member’s needs related to domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, or stalkingAn Executive Directive signed by Governor Roy Cooper in 2019 permits eligible state employees to use earned sick leave and vacation leave to respond to needs related to safety, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking
No statewide law exists for private sector employees, though a bill to do this was introduced in 2019 and 2021
Safe Leave has been endorsed by the Child Fatality Task Force
Sick LeavePaid short-term time off to care for a personal illness or injury (not work-related), which can include a mental health day and time to attend scheduled doctors’ appointmentsState Agency employees have 96 hours (or 12 days) yearly of sick leave to care for a personal illness or injury, attend medical appointments, care for a member of immediately family, for a death in immediate family, or for adoption of a child (30 days)
No statewide law exists for private sector employees, though a bill has been introduced every long session since 2007